Planing

Building Planing is the process of preparing for and forming buildings[1] and building systems.[2] Construction starts with planning, design, and financing and continues until the structure is ready for occupancy.Far from being a single activity, large scale construction is a feat of human multitasking.

Normally, the job is managed by a project manager, and supervised by a construction manager, design engineer, construction engineer or project architect. For the successful execution of a project, effective planning is essential. Those involved with the design and execution of the infrastructure in question must consider the zoning requirements, the environmental impact of the job, the successful scheduling, budgeting, construction site safety, availability and transportation of building materials, logistics, inconvenience to the public caused by construction delays and bidding, etc.

Growting

Grout is a construction material used to embed rebars in masonry walls, connect sections of pre-cast concrete, fill voids, and seal joints (like those between tiles). Grout is generally a mixture of water, cement, sand, often color tint, and sometimes fine gravel (if it is being used to fill the cores of concrete blocks). It is applied as a thick emulsion and hardens over time, much like its close relative mortar.[1] Unlike other structural pastes such as plaster or joint compound, grout, when mixed and applied correctly, creates a waterproof seal. 

Designing

Construction Management or Construction Project Management (CPM) is the overall planning, coordination, and control of a project from beginning to completion. CPM is aimed at meeting a client's requirement in order to produce a functionally and financially viable project.[1] The construction industry is composed of five sectors: residential, commercial, heavy civil, industrial, and environmental. A construction manager holds the same responsibilities and completes the same processes in each sector. All that separates a construction manager in one sector from one in another is the knowledge of the construction site. This may include different types of equipment, materials, subcontractors, and possibly locations.

Waterproofing

Water-proof or water-resistant describes objects relatively unaffected by water or resisting the ingress of water under specified conditions. Such items may be used in wet environments or under water to specified depths. Waterproofing describes making an object waterproof or water-resistant
"Water resistant" and "waterproof" often refer to penetration of water in its liquid state and possibly under pressure, whereas damp proof refers to resistance to humidity or dampness. Permeation of water vapor through a material or structure is reported as a water vapor transmission rate.

The hulls of boats and ships were once waterproofed by applying tar or pitch. Modern items may be waterproofed by applying water-repellent coatings or by sealing seams with gaskets or o-rings.

Architect

Architecture is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings and other physical structures. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements.

Architecture has to do with planning, designing and constructing form, space and ambience to reflect functional, technical, social, environmental and aesthetic considerations. It requires the creative manipulation and coordination of materials and technology, and of light and shadow.

Land Scaping

Construction requires study and observation. It is not the same in different parts of the world. Landscaping varies according to different regions.[1] Therefore normally local natural experts are recommended if it is done for the first time. Understanding of the site is one of the chief essentials for successful landscaping. Different natural features like terrain, topography, soil qualities, prevailing winds, depth of the frost line, and the system of native flora and fauna must be taken into account.[2] Sometimes the land is not fit for landscaping. In order to landscape it, the land must be reshaped. This reshaping of land is called grading.

Removal of earth from the land is called cutting while when earth is added to the slope, it is called filling. Sometimes the grading process may involve removal of excessive waste, soil and rocks, so designers should take into account while in the planning stage.[3][4]

Constructions

Construction is the process of preparing for and forming buildings[1] and building systems.[2] Construction starts with planning, design, and financing and continues until the structure is ready for occupancy.

Far from being a single activity, large scale construction is a feat of human multitasking. Normally, the job is managed by a project manager, and supervised by a construction manager, design engineer, construction engineer or project architect. For the successful execution of a project, effective planning is essential. Those involved with the design and execution of the infrastructure in question must consider the zoning requirements, the environmental impact of the job, the successful scheduling, budgeting, construction site safety, availability and transportation of building materials, logistics, inconvenience to the public caused by construction delays and bidding, etc.

Floating

A floating floor is a floor that does not need to be nailed or glued to the subfloor. The term floating floor refers to the installation method, but is often used synonymously with laminate flooring but is applied now to other coverings such as floating tile systems and vinyl flooring in a domestic context.

A sprung floor is a special type of floating floor designed to enhance sports or dance performance. In general though the term refers to a floor used to reduce noise or vibration.

A domestic floating floor might be constructed over a subfloor or even over an existing floor. It can consist of a glass fibre, felt or cork layer for sound insulation with neoprene pads holding up a laminate floor. There is a gap between the floating floor and the walls to decouple them and allow for expansion; this gap is covered with skirting boards or mouldings.

Electrical

Imagine yourself standing with a garden hose, ready to soak some unsuspecting passerby. The hose has water pressure and the water will flow through the hose onto the passerby when you open the nozzle. Prior to spraying, though, you stop and think about the similarities between water flow in a hose and electrical current flow in a wire.

You know that a pump, operating somewhere, creates the water pressure in the hose, which is measured in pounds per square inch (psi). That water pressure places the water in a "Ready to Flow" state. Similarly, an electric generator creates an electromotive force (EMF), which is measured in volts. The electricity in the wire is in a "Ready to Flow" state and has a certain voltage or EMF.

Now if you open the nozzle of that water hose, the unsuspecting passerby will get drenched with a flow of water. That water flow gets described in gallons per minute (gpm). The electrical rate of flow is defined as Current (I) and gets measured in Amps. In order for a motor to turn or a light bulb illuminate, current must flow.